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How the PGA Tour made the one-year move of its Asian events to America work | Golf World

At present, South Korea has some rather severe restrictions for incoming travelers. Any foreigner visiting the country is required to download an app at the airport and undergo a mandatory two-week quarantine period. In addition, no visitor is permitted to fly domestically within South Korea until completing the 14-day requirement. It’s part of the nation’s largely successful strategy to mitigate the impact of COVID-19—South Korea was one of the first countries to experience a major outbreak, but contact-tracing efforts and an advanced testing apparatus have coincided with steadily dropping infection and death rates.

On that front, it’s hard to argue with the mandatory quarantine. But as far as holding a golf tournament goes? It’s a bit of a deal-breaker.

“When those restrictions took place,” said Ty Votaw, executive vice president and chief marketing officer for the PGA Tour, when discussing the status of the tour’s Asian swing events, “we were

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America’s gifted education programs have a race problem. Can it be fixed?

This article about gifted education was produced in partnership with The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. This is part 1 of the series “Gifted Education’s Race Problem.”

BUFFALO, N.Y. — On a crisp day in early March, two elementary school gifted and talented classes worked on activities in two schools, 3 miles and a world apart.

In airy PS 64 Frederick Law Olmsted, in affluent, white north Buffalo, 22 would-be Arctic explorers wrestled with how to build a shelter if their team leader had frostbite and snow blindness. Unusually for Buffalo’s public schools — where 20 percent of students are white and 46 percent are Black — about half of the fourth grade class was white.

In PS 61 Arthur O. Eve, on the city’s majority-Black East Side, 13 first graders, all of them Black, Latino or Asian American, folded paper

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A Vitamix, a Roomba, and More Luxury Home & Kitchen Goods Are on Sale This Prime Day

We all have that list of dream cookware—the Le Creuset Dutch oven, the fancy espresso machine, the hammered-steel chef’s knife—that we covet, but never buy, because we just can’t justify the price. Enter Amazon Prime Day: It’s the perfect opportunity to snag the expensive stuff you’ve always wanted, at a significantly lower price. Here’s a list of a few of our favorites: 

(More in the market for kitchen tools under $25? We’ve got that list, too.) 

A Hefty Hammered Steel Chef’s Knife

This steel chef’s knife is a good pick for anyone who likes a heavier knife (and one that’s razor sharp, of course). It’s crafted from Japanese steel, which is renowned for both its durability and its ability to maintain a sharp edge. The ergonomic handle is made from a strong fiberglass-like material.

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PRIME DAY DEAL: Kyoku Daimyo Chef’s Knife, 8″

A Dependable Coffee Maker

Cuisinart products are made

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The Best Prime Day Kitchen Deals & Home Deals To Get Right Now

Amazon Prime Day has become something of a national holiday, and for good reason. With incredible deals on ties, tea kettles, tricked-out tablets and everything in between, there is plenty to celebrate and a little something for everyone. And when it comes to home cooks and armchair interior decorators, the two-day sales event offers some of the best Prime Day kitchen deals and Prime Day home deals — a chance to stock up on highly coveted culinary gear (juicers! air fryers! espresso machines!) and useful home goods at a fraction of the regular listing prices. 

Whether you are a casual internet shopper or someone who thinks of Prime Day as a competitive sport, we are here to help you navigate the savings. Below are some of the best Prime day kitchen and home deals live so far, but be sure to check back for more as we update over the

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Exclusive: Mitsui & Co to sell all stakes in coal-fired power plants by 2030

By Yuka Obayashi and Noriyuki Hirata

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese trading house Mitsui & Co Ltd plans to sell its remaining stakes in coal-fired power stations by the end of the decade as it shifts to gas from coal to help achieve its 2050 net zero emission target, its chief executive told Reuters.

“We still own stakes in coal-fired plants in Indonesia, China, Malaysia and Morocco, but our goal is to make it zero by 2030,” Mitsui CEO Tatsuo Yasunaga said in an interview on Friday.

The comment – Mitsui’s first on selling out of coal-fired power generation – comes as firms worldwide move away from coal to cut harmful carbon dioxide emissions and slow climate change.

Mitsui, which generates about two-thirds of profit from energy and metals, is also shifting away from oil.

“With the COVID-19 crisis, we have postponed investment in a few upstream oil deals, but our

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President Trump insists he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail, but doesn’t disclose if he tested negative

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a castle on top of a building: The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.


© J. Scott Applewhite
The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.

President Trump made the stunning announcement that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday, Oct. 2. Since that time, several others in Trump’s circle have tested positive for the virus. Here’s the latest about what we know:

  1:14 p.m.  

President Trump insists he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was healthy enough to return to the campaign trail, a day after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

Trump, who was poised Monday to host his first rally after his COVID-19

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President Trump’s doctor says he isn’t at risk of transmitting coronavirus, but doesn’t disclose if he tested negative

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a castle on top of a building: The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.


© J. Scott Applewhite
The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.

President Trump made the stunning announcement that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday, Oct. 2. Since that time, several others in Trump’s circle have tested positive for the virus. Here’s the latest about what we know:

  9:30 p.m.  

Trump’s taxes trace payments to properties by those who got ahead

By The Associated Press

Campaigning for president as a Washington outsider, Trump electrified rallies with his vows to “drain the swamp.” But he did not merely fail to end Washington’s insider culture of lobbying and favor-seeking. He reinvented it, turning his own hotels and resorts into the Beltway’s new backrooms, where public and private business mix and special interests

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Trump safe to discontinue isolation based on CDC standards

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a castle on top of a building: The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.


© J. Scott Applewhite
The White House is seen in Washington early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.

President Trump made the stunning announcement that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday, Oct. 2. Since that time, several others in Trump’s circle have tested positive for the virus. Here’s the latest about what we know:

  9:23 p.m.  

Doctor says Trump could safely discontinue isolation based on CDC standards

By The Associated Press

The White House doctor said Saturday night that President Donald Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, a diagnosis that comes as the president prepares to resume campaign rallies and other activities.

In a memo released by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump meets the Centers for Disease

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Meet the Winners – The Culture of Living: The Inspired Kitchen Contest

For Gaggenau, The Inspired Kitchen is a contest that pays homage to the heart of the home by inspiring design that assures, entertains, and sparks conversation. Designers were invited to put their creativity and design philosophy to the test by creating a culinary space where luxury is expressed through emotion, materials, craftsmanship, and aesthetics. Each designer submitted 3-to-6 kitchen illustrations, renderings, or drawings, including three Gaggenau appliances, as well as a written narrative describing their design inspiration and appliance selection. And, in the spirit of giving back, for the first 20 entrants, Gaggenau donated $500 per submission to The James Beard Foundation—an organization whose mission is to celebrate, nurture, and honor chefs and other leaders making America’s food culture more delicious, diverse, and sustainable.

The five winning designs were chosen based on creativity, originality, and functionality:

JENNIE BISHOP – Studio Gild

Jennie Bishop and design partners Melissa Benham and Kristen

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White House Blocked C.D.C. From Mandating Masks on Public Transit

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention drafted a sweeping order last month requiring all passengers and employees to wear masks on all forms of public and commercial transportation in the United States, but it was blocked by the White House, according to two federal health officials.

The order would have been the toughest federal mandate to date aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus, which continues to infect more than 40,000 Americans a day. The officials said that it was drafted under the agency’s “quarantine powers” and that it had the support of the secretary of health and human services, Alex M. Azar II, but the White House Coronavirus Task Force, led by Vice President

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