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Hawa Hassan Shares the Spicy Somali Pasta Recipe From Her New Cookbook, ‘In Bibi’s Kitchen’

Ingredients

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil or canola oil 

2 garlic cloves, minced 

1 small green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped 

1 small red onion, finely chopped 

1 pound ground beef 

3 tablespoons Xawaash Spice Mix (see below) 

1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed 

2 tablespoons tomato paste 

One 28-ounce can diced tomatoes, with their juices 

Cooked spaghetti (or whatever shape pasta you like) and coarsely chopped cilantro, for serving

Place the oil in a large skillet set over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, add the garlic, bell pepper, and onion. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Add the beef, Xawaash, and salt and cook, stirring occasionally to break up the beef, until the meat is browned, about 15 minutes.

Add the tomato paste and diced tomatoes (and their juices). Fill the tomato can halfway with water and

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Nordic author Patrice Johnson’s new cookbook celebrates Minnesota’s rich food traditions

“I am a Minnesotan, born with appetite for food and life.”

With those words, Patrice Johnson opens her “Land of 10,000 Plates: Stories and Recipes From Minnesota” (Minnesota Historical Society Press, $24.95), a just-released collection of essays and recipes that focus on the multicultural food rituals celebrated across the state as well as in Johnson’s own kitchen.

In a recent phone conversation, Johnson, the author of “Jul: Swedish American Holiday Traditions,” discussed Tater Tot hot dish, wild rice, climate change and her passion for church cookbooks.

Q: This book is a big change from your Nordic foodways work. Why the switch?

A: Minnesota is my first love. When I’ve done the Nordic stuff, that’s all about my cultural history and how I connect with my family. But Minnesota, it’s more than culture, it’s my people. Minnesota means so much to me. Living here is such a blessing.

 

Q: Isn’t every

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Cookbook Review: ‘Sous Vide: Better Home Cooking’ by Hugh Acheson

Later, I made eggplant in a mix of mirin, soy, and ginger. After that, I tried leeks barigoule, an Acheson riff on a classic Provençal dish usually made by braising artichokes. I also tried an acorn squash dish with pumpkin seeds, chocolate, and queso fresco, something that Acheson classifies as “wackier than it is.” I tried the latter on family dinner night, getting my niece and nephew to grate the chocolate over the squash, and it got thumbs up from everyone at the table.

I was getting into a groove with the book, and while the recipes were sometimes a bit cheffy, they also tended to be profoundly good, leaving me both wanting more and thinking about the food I’d made for days. They’re also classic sous vide, often starting with slow, precise cooking in the bag, followed by a quick sear on the stove or under the broiler for

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’Cooking for One’ is a new cookbook and concept whose time has come



a plate of food on a table: Lemony Spaghetti is a one pan recipe from America’s Test Kitchen’s newest cookbook, “Cooking for One.” [Steve Klise]


© Steve Klise
Lemony Spaghetti is a one pan recipe from America’s Test Kitchen’s newest cookbook, “Cooking for One.” [Steve Klise]

Readers have regularly asked for recipes for a single portion. Each time I see a book with that theme, I check it out and do a story.

Among the most notable was from Judith Jones, Julia Child’s book editor, “The Pleasure of Cooking for One” in 2009.

Now, there’s a new one from America’s Test Kitchen that may finally satisfy all who want to prepare a dish for one. That’s because “Cooking for One” ($29.99) brings easy, new techniques to the game.



a plate of food: Sheet Pan Sausages include sweet potatoes and rabe. [Steve Klise]


© Steve Klise
Sheet Pan Sausages include sweet potatoes and rabe. [Steve Klise]

Never has it seemed more important. It’s not just that some people are staying safe alone during this pandemic, it’s that others are not.

Jack Bishop, chief creative officer at America’s Test Kitchen, said

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