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Florida health price website gets little public attention

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A program pushed by former Gov Rick Scott to help people compare prices and shop for medical procedures has cost taxpayers millions of dollars but has garnered little attention from the public.

The state has paid more than $5 million for the FloridaHealthPriceFinder website over the past three years, according to a review of state financial records. But the site has generated just 131,653 visits since its launch in November 2017, information from the state Agency for Health Care Administration shows.

Despite a lack of visits, AHCA officials remain upbeat about the initiative.

“FloridaHealthPriceFinder is still out there going strong,” Nikole Helvey, bureau chief of the Florida Center for Health Information and Transparency, told members of a health-information advisory committee Thursday.

She also said the state in July began collecting 2019 claims data, which is being reviewed for accuracy and quality. Helvey said the FloridaHealthPriceFinder website will

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DC health department, other localities want White House event attendees to get tested for coronavirus

The Washington, D.C., Department of Health on Thursday released an open letter asking that White House staff and anyone who attended a Sept. 26 event in the Rose Garden contact their health department for guidance on the possible need to quarantine after multiple attendees, including the president, tested positive for COVID.

The letter, co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions, indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected President Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members, and two U.S. senators, among others.

In this Sept. 26, 2020, photo President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington. Former New Jersey Gov. 

In this Sept. 26, 2020, photo President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington. Former New Jersey Gov. 
(AP)

The letter says

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Health officials urge attendees of White House event to get tested for coronavirus

D.C. Health Director LaQuandra Nesbitt and health officers from nine other counties and cities across the Washington region sent a letter Thursday to “community members” asking anyone who worked in the White House in the past two weeks to get tested. In addition, it asked that people be tested who attended the Rose Garden event or who had close contact with someone who did.

The letter contains contact information for local health departments.

“As an additional reminder, if you are identified as a contact, having a negative test does not limit the time period within which you are required to quarantine,” the leaders wrote, citing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that recommend a 14-day quarantine.

The letter was distributed to people and organizations in each health department’s network, which in D.C. included Advisory Neighborhood Commission members, the D.C. Council and the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments,

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The confusing and contradictory statements about Trump’s health

Information about President Trump’s condition has been incomplete, confusing and, at times, contradictory since early Friday morning when the commander in chief announced that he had tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Trump’s medical team, led by White House physician Sean Conley, has been criticized for painting a rosy portrait of Trump’s condition Saturday, without disclosing that the president had been given supplemental oxygen or put on a steroid that is usually reserved for severely ill coronavirus patients.

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, over his course of illness, has had,” Conley said. “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction. And in doing so, you know, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true. … The fact of the matter is that he’s doing really well.”

[Trump

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Under America’s Broken Health Care System, Some Who Downplayed COVID-19 Received the Best Treatment For It

Jodi Click, who suffers from severe Crohn’s Disease, has long been accustomed to frequent doctors visits and medical procedures. But nothing prepared the 40-year-old for her lengthy battle with COVID-19 this year. After contracting the virus in March, she has spent months enduring the aftermath of the disease: unpredictable blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and low oxygenation levels. She now relies on a walker for mobility.

Her wallet hasn’t recovered either. Because of her prolonged illness, she quit her teaching job, which meant she lost her employer health insurance and was forced to switch to a government insurance plan amidst a wave of health problems. She’s now struggling to afford basic necessities, while waiting weeks for her insurance to authorize payment for medical procedures, like an echocardiogram, that her doctors recommend. “I will probably have to sell my house and move home with my parents,” Click says, “even though I

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Despite the White House’s COVID-19 Outbreak, the Trump Campaign Continues to Ignore Public Health Guidelines

It’s safe to say that if most political campaigns had seen its candidate, campaign manager, and more than a dozen associates test positive for COVID-19 within days of each other, they would likely reassess the strategy of holding large, in-person events that could be potential breeding grounds for the highly-infectious and deadly disease.



a person looking at the camera: A car with U.S. President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.


© Alex Edelman—AFP/Getty Images
A car with U.S. President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.

Not so with the Trump campaign.

While briefly pausing in-person events after President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump disclosed their positive diagnoses on Oct. 2, the campaign announced, just a day later, that “Operation MAGA”—a series of in-person events that the campaign touted as a way to “energize and mobilize the MAGA universe to maintain full speed until the President returns to the campaign trail”—will commence

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